Why our schools are NOT failing your children

This morning I read this article by recent graduate Johanna O’Farrell in The Age.  Of course any article which opens with “Why your schools are failing your children: a teacher tells” piqued my interest.  I have always advocated for teachers telling their stories in our media rather than politicians but this one had my heart rate rising as she spoke of schools tossing aside “any sort of rigour, routine or repetition when it comes to classroom learning.”

I am truly concerned of Johanna’s experiences in schools where she believes that the strategy is that students “will simply learn to read and write by osmosis” and that rote learning should be a valid part of learning.

If we want our schools to factories of students who can travel a conveyer belt learning times tables through hours of chanting and memorising the laws of the English Language then maybe she has a point.  But I couldn’t imagine why we would want students to know facts in isolation and that a “blackboard and chalk, a pen and paper, a few good books and some learned teachers will suffice.” Isn’t an education of experiences which connect ideas, is in context with the real world and develop skills of self directed life long learning a more holistic approach?  Sure, we can rote learn many things if we believe the learning journey ends with our VCE results.

I am saddened that Johanna doesn’t have the knowledge to explain why students expression in English is wrong, not because she was denied learning about the laws of the English language but because she was not exposed to experience of curiosity, self directed learning and how to take control of her own learning.

Maybe this is a message that we need to be more articulate in what we are doing in schools.  I too believe that technology is not a silver bullet and have questioned the use of “genius hours” or “inquiry learning days.”  But I do believe that inquiry learning and technology should be embedded into our classrooms and become as normal as pen and paper learning and chalk and talk was in the past. We need to talk about why we do what we do.  It is more than engagement.  It is embedding real experiences and constructing knowledge through context, introducing conflicting ideas, connecting those experiences and developing their own understandings.

Maybe the more we talk about the why, the less misconception will be there about the relevance of education and demonstrate how schools are helping our students to succeed.

4 thoughts on “Why our schools are NOT failing your children”

  1. If Johanna’s understanding that students learn “by osmosis” when undertaking inquiry-based learning, then it looks like both the university and the schools she did practicum at need to communicate much better. Also, by her comment about students being unable to learn about maths by cooking pizza, well obviously Mindstorms isn’t on the reading list!

  2. I particularly agree with what you have said in your second last paragraph, about inquiry and technology being embedded in education. The reality is that the world is changing, and so this type of learning and working is becoming more prevalent. It will not only be the new norm in education, but in the work work as well.

    1. Thanks for your comment, Marcia. Yes I agree the reality is that the world is changing. I think a difficulty we have is to get the message out. Often the media and parents own experience of schooling is a large influence on what people perceive as the norm. Only this morning I read in the newspaper of a parent who had changed schools as the focus on the student was too personalised!

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